Our Paleo Family

The Best Beef Jerky

When you first start following the autoimmune paleo diet (AIP), even if you’ve already been paleo for a while, finding something to eat that is appealing and on the “good” list is a real challenge. When I first started AIP, I wasn’t eating enough at meal times and was often hungry between meals. I would go to the pantry for a snack and realize I couldn’t eat the nuts that I would have chosen before. I’m eating so many vegetables during my meals, I don’t want more as a snack. Just being honest. I know I should be munching on carrots and celery sticks. But celery without peanut butter is just something that makes me have to floss. Not interested.

Fruit is a good choice, but I really don’t love fruit. I know that’s weird. I have to be reveling in the fresh fall season to want to snack on an apple. And I NEVER want to snack on a banana. Just not my favorites. So what is left? Usually some sort of meat stick or jerky is where I land. If you’ve tried to buy jerky at your local store, you know it is hard to find one that is made with entirely grass-fed beef, contains little to no sugar, no soy and no seasonings that are off limits on an elimination diet. So I just make my own. I love it and what I love even more is that my kids love it. We cannot keep this around more than a few days.

 

The Best Beef Jerky
Print Recipe
A simple, healthy snack everyone will love!
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
3-5 hours
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
3-5 hours
The Best Beef Jerky
Print Recipe
A simple, healthy snack everyone will love!
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
3-5 hours
Servings Prep Time
12 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
3-5 hours
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Place the roast in your freezer for 30 minutes to an hour. This helps it to slice a little easier.
  2. Peel ginger and chop roughly. You want your pieces to be small, but don't worry about getting them very, very fine. If you can't find fresh ginger root at your store, look for it already peeled and chopped in a jar where you can get garlic in a jar - usually somewhere on a little shelf in the produce section. Use 2 teaspoons of the jarred kind.
  3. Combine all ingredients except meat and bacon grease in a large zip top bag and smoosh it all together to combine well.
  4. Once meat has chilled a little, start with a very sharp knife. If you bought an eye round roast, you will need to cut it in half.
  5. If you bought a london broil, you can start slicing away. This is where you have to make a decision. Do you want really thin, tougher pieces of jerky or do you want it a little thicker and more meaty? Me, I like it a little thicker. I think it's just easier to eat that way. I try to slice my roast into 1/4 inch slices. If you are an expert in the knife department and want it really thin, go for it.
  6. Add the meat slices to the marinade mixture and pop it in the fridge. I usually start my marinade at night and let it go overnight.
  7. Prepare a cooking rack that will fit inside a rimmed baking sheet (see notes below for details) by greasing the rack with cooking fat of your choice. I like bacon fat. It adds a little subtle flavor to the jerky. But you could use coconut oil, lard, olive oil, etc. And only use bacon fat if it comes from high quality bacon.
  8. Place the rack in the baking sheet and lay out your marinated pieces of meaty goodness on the rack. Do not overlap them. They can touch, but not overlap.
  9. Place in a 175 degree oven for 3-5 hours. Baking time depends on how thin you sliced your meat. For my thicker slices, I need 5 hours. I flip them over half way through. Just check periodically to see that they are cooking properly and not getting overdone.
  10. This final product is from an earlier batch where I used london broil and sliced it much thinner. You can see that it isn't almost black like a lot of jerkyies, but yet when I pulled a piece apart, there was absolutely no juice coming out. You want it very dry, just not so dry you can't chew it!
  11. Your jerky should last outside of the fridge for a few days, but why risk it? I keep it in an airtight container in the fridge and it *should* last for a couple weeks. It never hangs around that long in my house so I can't be sure.
Recipe Notes

I received a couple of these pan/rack combos for Christmas a few years ago and I honestly use them every day! Mine came from a restaurant supply store in town, but this pan and this rack look the same. You want heavy duty, oven safe pans and racks. Check your local yellow pages (boy, how old am I??) or I guess you could be all hip and modern and use Google to find out if you have a restaurant supply store near you. They carry really high quality kitchen wares for a very reasonable price.

Share this Recipe
 
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

2 thoughts on “The Best Beef Jerky

  1. Maritza Pearce

    Thank you so much Elizabeth for sharing your struggles and your recipes! I look forward to making this. Just today I noticed whole foods had their house jerky for 14.99 per HALF pound!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *