Our Paleo Family

Paleo “Fried” Chicken and Gravy (AIP)

I come from the Midwest, where we do meat and potatoes and gravy very well. This sort of meal was a staple in my house growing up. It’s comfort food at it’s best. Once I got married, I considered myself a healthy cook, so gravy was out.

For all that we don’t eat while following a paleo or autoimmune protocol diet, it’s nice that some good old throw-back dishes are back on the menu.

This chicken is incredibly easy to prepare and really tasty. It is a staple dinner in our house. Stick a couple sweet potatoes in the oven and add in whatever green vegetable we have in the fridge and dinner is complete.

Paleo "Fried" Chicken and Gravy (AIP)
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Paleo "Fried" Chicken and Gravy (AIP)
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Add fat to heavy skillet or dutch oven, cast iron is best, and place in oven to heat.
  3. Trim chicken of all obvious fat and veins. Little bits of fat will melt off in cooking, but thighs tend to have big globs of it so I like to take that off. And removing any veins or sinew just prevents the "Ooh, gross, what is that?!?" at the table. Salt and pepper (if you can tolerate pepper) both sides.
  4. Remove skillet from oven and add chicken. Try not to overlap, but if it has to overlap a bit, just pull the chicken back out in about 10 minutes and it will have shrunk enough that you can separate the pieces. Set your timer for 15 minutes.
  5. Flip chicken over and bake 15 minutes more.
  6. Meanwhile, if you're having baked sweet potatoes, clean them, prick a few times with a fork and microwave for two minutes, then wrap in foil and add to oven with the chicken. They should be fully baked in the time the chicken cooks.
  7. When chicken is done, it should be browned on both sides and crispy on top. Remove from oven, set chicken on a plate and cover loosely with foil while you make the gravy.
To Make the Gravy
  1. If there are more than two tablespoons of fat in your skillet, pour some off reserving just one to two tablespoons. As a general rule, one tablespoon of fat will yield one cup of gravy. Two tablespoons yields two cups and so on. So plan for how much you want in the end.
  2. Place your skillet on the stove, over medium-high heat. You need approximately the same amount of starch (arrowroot or cassava flour) as fat. (In my experience, cassava flour has more thickening power than arrowroot so add it in a little at a time.) Sprinkle in your starch and whisk constantly. Try to scrape the cooked bits off the bottom of your skillet. Add a little salt and pepper.
  3. Once you have incorporated all of the starch, what's in your pan should look dry and crumbly. Now begin to add your broth slowly, whisking the whole time. When you add the liquid to the hot pan, any yummy bits stuck to the bottom of the pan will loosen. This is called deglazing. You've probably heard that term if you've ever watched a cooking show.
  4. Continue to whisk until your gravy is thick. It needs to bubble to reach it's full thickness. At this point, taste it to see if you need to add salt or pepper. If it gets too thick, add a little more broth. Serve immediately over hot chicken. It's really yummy on the potatoes as well. And if you hate broccoli like I do, go ahead and put some gravy on it! You're getting good bone broth so don't feel bad about all the gravy.
Recipe Notes

The sweet potatoes you see pictured here are Hannah sweet potatoes. They are a white variety. I find them in my local Whole Foods a couple times a year. They had them this spring when I was preparing my garden so I grew some. They are not as sweet as your standard orange sweet potatoes and I think because of the color, fool your brain into thinking you're eating "regular" potatoes. Sometimes I just crave a regular potato.

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2 thoughts on “Paleo “Fried” Chicken and Gravy (AIP)

  1. Christin

    I’m so excited to have a friend who has some experience with AIP cooking… And AIP life in general! ( You may be sorry you told me about your blog…šŸ˜‰) Which do you like better, arrowroot or cassava? I only have experience with arrowroot, but it’s time to buy more and might try cassava if you think it produces a better sauce. In my experience arrowroot can quickly go gummy or even slimy. Any thoughts? Thanks Elizabeth! Christin

    1. Elizabeth Post author

      I’m so glad you’re here! I agree on the slimy factor of arrowroot. In my experience cassava gets gummy and sort of chewy. Slight distinction and neither is ideal. Everyone in the paleosphere talks about Otto’s cassava flour, so that’s what I purchased first, and have now used up. I’ve just ordered another brand called Moon River, which was much cheaper. It should come today and I plan to work with it a lot this week. Perhaps it will work differently?? For quick thickening of a sauce like the gravy with the chicken, I think the difference is negligible. The arrowroot does dissolve and thicken more quickly. For adding to baked goods, the arrowroot helps to lighten the almond flour and add flakiness. I’m waiting to see how it works with other AIP flours. Stay tuned!

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