Our Paleo Family

Old Fashioned Pot Roast in the Instant Pot




Right around Christmas time last year I jumped on the Instant Pot band wagon. What I thought I was buying was a new appliance that would allow me to cook typically slow cooking foods in a short amount of time.

What I actually received was so much more. If you’ve been a reader here for any length of time, you likely know that I despise the crock pot. I just don’t like the way food tastes that is prepared in that machine.

Well, lo and behold, the Instant Pot is a pressure cooker, a rice cooker, a sauté pan and a slow cooker all in one! The most marvelous thing about this combo is the ability to sauté something and then either slow cook or pressure cook it right in that same pan. The only way to get good flavor out of crock pot food (in my opinion) is to sauté it on the stove first and this nifty appliance saves me a pan to wash because you do all these steps in one place! Super convenient.

I have never used the rice cooker function because, frankly, we don’t eat that much rice, but I’ve read that it performs that job like a champ. What I have done lots and lots is use the pressure cooking function.

I mostly use it to make bone broth and meat that would typically require several hours in the oven or crock pot. Honestly, I’ve only used the Instant Pot as a crock pot/slow cooker one time and that was just to see if it really worked. I don’t know why I would ever want to cook something painfully slowly when I could cook it super fast. My life just hasn’t called for that scenario yet. But I’m also a stay at home mom. If you’re going to work away from home everyday, then you would likely find lots of uses for the slow cooker function.

If you haven’t checked out my YouTube channel, I encourage you to do so because I have lots of Instant Pot instructional videos over there, including this Pot Roast video that has gone as close to viral as anything I’ve ever done, with something around 16,000 views, with the accompanying bone broth video garnering around 1,200 views. This is crazy to me. I guess people really want to see how to make this dish.

If you watch that video, what you will note is that it took a really long time for my meat to cook, which apparently was pretty controversial. So I did what any good scientist would do – I made it again (and again and again) and indeed my roast cooked in half the time. Something was clearly wrong with that other cut of meat.



So now I have written up the recipe that you can see me make on the videos. This recipe is essentially the same as the one published by thedomesticman.com and linked here.

I did make a few tweaks to his recipe, but it was his originally so I want to make sure to give credit where credit is due.

One important note: when I asked my butcher which cut of meat he recommended for this recipe, he directed me to the Chuck Blade roast, which is, I believe, what I had when I first made this recipe and what I’m working with in this second video as well. I would suggest you use a different type of roast. This particular cut just didn’t get as tender as others I’ve made previously. I would recommend a round (top or bottom), chuck (just not blade) or even a brisket.

I apologize for the shocking lack of photos of this dish. When I make an instructional video, I completely forget to take photos as well. But I think you all know what pot roast looks like. It’s not the prettiest dish, but it sure is tasty!

You can view the video of me making this Pot Roast in the Instant Pot here:

 




Old Fashioned Pot Roast in the Instant Pot
Print Recipe
Servings
4-6 servings
Cook Time Passive Time
60 minutes 35 minutes
Servings
4-6 servings
Cook Time Passive Time
60 minutes 35 minutes
Old Fashioned Pot Roast in the Instant Pot
Print Recipe
Servings
4-6 servings
Cook Time Passive Time
60 minutes 35 minutes
Servings
4-6 servings
Cook Time Passive Time
60 minutes 35 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Turn Instant Pot on to Sauté High. Add cooking fat.
  2. Rub meat with 1/2 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. black pepper. Add meat to hot oil and brown on each side. This should take 3-4 minutes per side.
  3. Once meat is browned on all sides, remove to a plate and set aside.
  4. Keeping Instant Pot on Saute High, add sliced onion, cooking until tender and slightly browned, about 8 minutes. Stir occasionally.
  5. Once onions are slightly browned and tender, add tomato paste and allow that to cook for 3 minutes.
  6. Add vinegar, fish sauce, garlic and broth. Stir well to combine.
  7. Add roast back to the pot and secure the lid. Turn valve to sealing.
  8. Set Instant Pot to Manual, High pressure, 35 minutes. While the roast cooks, clean and chop your vegetables to even, approximately 1 inch cubes. Cover and set aside.
  9. Once the 35 minutes has passed, allow to depressurize for about 5 minutes, then move the valve from sealing to venting to release the rest of the pressure.
  10. Remove the roast to a baking sheet and cut into roughly two inch chunks. Taste the broth and add more salt and/or pepper if desired. Remember that you are adding a bunch of unseasoned vegetables so you will likely need to add salt and pepper now. Add the vegetables and reseal the Instant Pot. Set to High pressure for 6 minutes. Make sure to move the valve back to sealing.
  11. Turn your oven broiler on to high. Place meat under broiler and broil for about five minutes, watching carefully so that it doesn't burn, and turning it once or twice during this time to brown all sides. Remove meat to serving platter. Cover with foil to keep warm.
  12. Once vegetable cooking time has elapsed, move the valve to venting to release the pressure. Turn Instant pot back on to Sauté High.
  13. Using a slotted spoon, remove all vegetables from the Instant Pot to the same baking sheet you used to broil your meat. Place the baking sheet back under the broiler to brown and crisp the vegetables. This should take 8-10 minutes. Watch them carefully and flip the veggies over halfway through.
  14. Meanwhile, once your broth comes to a boil, add your thickener. If using glucomannan, add 1/4 tsp. at a time, whisk in well, and only add more if you want your sauce to be thicker. Mine took a full teaspoon, but add carefully and slowly to get the thickness you desire. If using arrowroot (or cassava flour or tapioca) add the starch to a bowl of 2 Tbsp. cold water and mix well. Now add this slurry to your boiling broth and whisk in well. Allow this to boil for a couple minutes to come to it's full thickening power. If you want your sauce thicker, you can add more. Again taste for seasoning and add more salt and/or pepper if desired.
  15. Remove veggies from oven and add them to your platter with the meat. Either drizzle the gravy over the dish or serve separately. Bon appetite!
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