Our Paleo Family

New and Improved AIP tortillas **Updated 8/17

I have been trying to love cassava flour. As best I can tell, Otto’s Cassava Flour hit the mainstream sometime this past summer and all the paleo-sphere was a-buzz about it.

I’ve used it in baked goods, as a thickener and in tortillas and honestly, I just don’t love it. It works pretty well, but it has a taste that I don’t care for. I made some AIP biscuits over the weekend and they were terrible. I guess if you were just DESPERATE for a biscuit while following the autoimmune protocol, these could pass for acceptable, but I’d rather just not have biscuits.

Once I used up my Otto’s cassava flour, I bought another brand, Moon Rabbit, and it tastes and performs just like Otto’s, but at a lower price. I bought mine on Amazon, but have since seen it at Whole Foods.

The chicken or beef enchilada post included a recipe for tortillas using cassava flour and they worked, were AIP approved, but were a pain in the neck to make. Rolling out on parchment and oh-so-carefully peeling it off. Irritating. And way too much work!

Tonight, I made at least my sixth batch of tortillas and finally found a recipe that tastes good and was not a killer to make.

These are best warm, right out of the skillet, but are perfectly fine leftover out of the fridge. I do not like to eat with my hands. I don’t like that drippy juice and mess on my hands, so I inevitably end up eating tacos with a knife and fork. My husband and kids think this is the weirdest thing ever. But the point is – you can pick these up and eat them with your hands. If you’re a barbarian. 🙂 IMG_3867

When I went back for a second taco, I left the tortilla flat and made a tostada. It was easier to eat this way and much less messy.

 

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I have found that if you undercook these just a little, they are more pliable and remain like a true flour tortilla. If you cook them longer – say 4-5 minutes per side, they get really crispy. I prefer the taste when they’re cooked longer, but it is nice to have a soft, foldable tortilla. You can experiment and decide which you like best.

Because these do last well in the refrigerator, I recommend making a batch or two when you have the time and keeping them on hand for quick quesadillas or tacos.

This recipe is much easier than the earlier one I posted, so scratch that recipe and use this one instead.

We ate these tonight with the leftover Cuban Pork and I promise these were the best tacos I’ve had in a long, long time.

August 2017 update: In an effort to keep the carb count down, I swapped coconut flour for the arrowroot starch in the recipe. I used the same amount as listed for arrowroot and they were even better! I was afraid they would taste way too much like coconut, but they did not and I actually liked the flavor better than the cassava/arrowroot combo. But best of all, they remained nice and soft, but still a little crispy around the edges, after sitting for about 30 minutes while I got the rest of dinner ready. My son, who never liked the old recipe, thought these were great. Maybe it’s just that his palate is two years older, but I agree, this version tastes better and the texture is nicer. Note that you do need to add more water when using coconut flour. Make sure your dough is nice and moist and not cracking at all when you roll it into balls.

Stuffed full of fish, slaw and salsa and still holding together!


New and Improved AIP tortillas
Print Recipe
Yes, you can eat tortillas again!
Servings Prep Time
10 tortillas 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 tortillas 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-60 minutes
New and Improved AIP tortillas
Print Recipe
Yes, you can eat tortillas again!
Servings Prep Time
10 tortillas 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
10 tortillas 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-60 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: tortillas
Instructions
  1. Mix arrowroot, cassava and salt in a mixing bowl. Add palm shortening or lard and combine until you have what looks like little pebbles.
  2. Add water and mix until well combined. You want the mixture to become a solid dough ball, with no dry spots. Cassava and arrowroot are both very absorbent, so make sure you mix well and get all the dry ingredients moist. If your dough is too dry, you may have trouble rolling out the tortillas. Depending on your weather, you may need to add a tad more water.
  3. Divide dough into 8-10 equal sized portions. I made 10 because we wanted smaller tortillas. If you want bigger, then make only 8 portions.
  4. Add a little arrowroot or cassava flour to your counter top so you can roll the dough without it sticking. I used a bench scraper* to help lift each tortilla from the counter and transport to the skillet. They are delicate at this stage. If your tortilla rips, just moisten with a little water and press it back together. It will be good as new.
  5. Roll dough into roughly a circular shape. You want to roll it very thin. They will puff while cooking and will be more substantial than they seem when raw. Trust me.
  6. Heat a (preferably) non-stick skillet to medium/medium high heat and add about a teaspoon of fat. Once melted, add one tortilla at a time. Fry for 2-3 minutes per side, just until very slightly browned, then flip and cook for 2-3 more minutes on the other side.
  7. Remove to a plate and cover with either a damp paper towel or piece of foil to keep warm.
  8. Repeat until you have cooked all of your dough. I listed the cooking time as 30-60 minutes because it took me an hour to cook all of my tortillas. Like a dummy, I used only one skillet. If I had used two, I could have cooked them all in half the time.
Recipe Notes

*A bench scraper is a super valuable tool in the kitchen. I know a lot of people like to roll out dough on parchment or one of those silicone mats, but I think that just makes the job more difficult or gives me something else to wash. I prefer to roll right onto my counter. I usually use my bench scraper to pick up my dough and transport to the skillet or cookie sheet. And sometimes if I've made a terrible mess of the counter top, I use the bench scraper as it's name implies and scrape the gunk off my counters with it.

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